Not technically. These two conditions are often related because heel spurs can actually be one of the causes of Plantar Fasciitis. Since the symptoms can feel the same. Heel spurs are sometimes misdiagnosed as plantar fasciitis, but they are two distinct conditions that need to be treated differently. A heel spur is a calcium deposit that causes a build-up of bony tissue on the bottom of the heel bone. Sometimes, a heel spur is completely painless. But other times, it can get intertwined with and pull on the plantar fascia, which can be painful. If that is the case, you need to resolve the heel spur before you can get some resolution to the Plantar Fasciitis. Interestingly, a heel spur can form over time when a tight plantar fascia pulls on the bone, causing the bone to react by building a calcium deposit. In this case we also need to resolve the heel spur first. This is why an accurate diagnosis is so important when treating Plantar Fasciitis.